oh dear

Oh noes! Accent meme

Baa! Baaaaaaaa! Flist, I follow you! But this can't be right, can it?
What American accent do you have?
Your Result: The Midland

"You have a Midland accent" is just another way of saying "you don't have an accent." You probably are from the Midland (Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, southern Indiana, southern Illinois, and Missouri) but then for all we know you could be from Florida or Charleston or one of those big southern cities like Atlanta or Dallas. You have a good voice for TV and radio.

Philadelphia
Boston
The Northeast
The West
The Inland North
The South
North Central
What American accent do you have?


I mean, I come from Massachusetts, and my parents definitely sound like New Englanders. (Not Bostonians, mind you, whom I hear as slightly different from my parents. The As are different.) After leaving the Bay State, I moved to the Bay Area, where I have been surrounded by Californians. And as far as I know, I sound like a Californian now: I drawl a little bit, and my Rs have far more presence than they used to. My parents tell me I sound Californian to them.

But perhaps I don't talk like a Californian after all.
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Dude, you totally sound Californian to me. Fully integrated, I'd say. :-)
I am totally guessing that I missed some single cue that would have let them bin me as a Californian. Or that some trace of Boston remains. But I haven't said "wicked good" in twenty years! And I have to put it on deliberately when I say "You can't paak in Haavaad Yaahd. There ain't paaking theah and theah hasn't been in yeeiz."
Mine came up "midland" as well, which is so not true. I have a strong Southern accent. (Some of the questions didn't work with my particular accent: unless I'm being careful and trying to "talk right," "on" rhymes with neither "dawn" nor "don"; it rhymes with "own." *g*)
The first time I read about American accents, I was surprised to read that for some speakers, "Mary", "merry", and "marry" sound alike. They're so different for me! The PBS article I linked to on the emergence of a true Californian accent was fascinating, as were the other articles on the site about speech. I have some other links stored up, all part of the writing research fodder.

(I have been trying to write feedback for "Grief, Written on Skin" for two days now. I had to read it several times before it sank in. This is a good thing. A surface meaning, an immediate emotional reaction, then a deeper meaning, a second emotional reaction. Whose grief is written on skin? Rupert's, in the initial reading, but Rupert's grief is notable for its lack of expression, at least as reported by Wesley. But I really should write this over in the comments on the story...)
I came out slightly more midlands than you, with Philly high on my scale--which is pretty odd since I've never been farther east than Branson, Missouri. And not even that since I was 5. I've lived in the Southwest for 25 years but apparently, that hasn't affected me much.